Alzheimer’s and Taste

Dysphagia and Dementia

Dysphagia (dis-FAY-juh) is a medical term for a swallowing disorder. According to the National Institutes of Health, swallowing problems occur in about 45% of those have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and other dementias. It can occur in a person with moderate to advanced dementia.  The main risk and danger is that the person who suffers from this disorder may aspirate or inhale food or liquid into the airway and lungs, thus causing pneumonia. There is also the danger of dehydration or malnutrition with the lack of sufficient intake of liquids and food.  May 20 carrot soup-482354_640

Eating/Swallowing Process

Swallowing is a complex function involving over fifty pairs of muscles and numerous nerves. Swallowing problems are often the first indicator that dementia has entered the moderate stage of the disease. The American Speech-Language-Hearing-Association (ASHA) notes that dysphagia can occur at different stages in the eating/swallowing process:

  • Oral phase – sucking, chewing, and moving food or liquid into the throat.
  • Pharyngeal phase – starting the swallowing reflex, squeezing food down the throat, and closing off the airway to prevent food or liquid from entering the airway (aspiration) or to prevent choking.
  • Esophageal phase – relaxing and tightening the openings at the top and bottom of the feeding tube in the throat (esophagus) and squeezing food through the esophagus into the stomach.
NICHD Swallowing Chart

NICHD Swallowing Chart

Dysphagia Symptoms

Caregivers can help prevent serious complications by identifying the early stages at which swallowing problems begin. Each person with this swallowing disorder is different, but some signs and symptoms may include:

  • coughing during or right after eating or drinking
  • wet or gurgly sounding voice during or after eating or drinking
  • extra effort or time needed to chew or swallow
  • food or liquid leaking from the mouth or getting stuck in the mouth
  • chest congestion after eating
  • weight loss or dehydration from not being able to eat enough.

If any of these symptoms are present, to prevent pneumonia, consult with your loved one’s physician as soon as possible. They will likely give you a referral to a specialist such as a speech or language therapist to conduct a swallowing assessment.

Making Modifications

As the dementia progresses, you may need to make modifications to foods and liquids in order for your loved one to eat and drink safely. Here are some suggestions taken from the National Institute on Aging that might help:

  1. Alternate hot and cold foods to help trigger a swallow. Cold drinks are also easier to swallow than hot drinks.
  2. Cut the food into small pieces and make it soft enough to eat.
  3. Offer soft foods, such as ice cream, protein milk shakes, yogurt, soups, applesauce, gelatin, or custard.
  4. Thin liquids, like coffee, tea, water, or broth, are hardest to swallow. Buy Thick-It to add to liquids to make them thicker. You can purchase it at most pharmacies.
  5. Don’t use a straw; it may cause more swallowing problems. Instead, have the person drink small sips from a cup. (Check out the Teepa Snow video below.)
  6. Limit the amount of milk the person drinks if it tends to catch in the throat.
  7. Sweet taste receptors remain intact through the end stage of dementia. Persons at this stage usually favor sweets and can be enticed to eat by adding sweet thickeners to their foods.
  8. Don’t hurry your loved one. They may need extra time to chew and swallow each mouthful before taking another bite.
  9. Position your loved one in an upright, sitting position, with their neck forward and chin down when swallowing. Don’t feed them if they are drowsy or lying down.
  10. In the later stages, you may have to gently stroke their neck in a downward motion and say, “swallow” to remind them to swallow.
  11. If your loved one is on medication, find out if their pills can be crushed or taken in liquid form.

Mealtimes will not always be easy, but it helps to make these as pleasant and enjoyable as possible. There will be times when your loved one will not be hungry when you’re ready to serve food. Or they may not feel like eating much at that time but get hungry at other times. In the later stages of the disease, many people lose interest in food. Consult with the doctor if they are losing weight and ask what supplements, if any, to use.

I wish you peace, patience, and joy in your caregiving today and every day!

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For more detailed information regarding dysphagia, check the National Institutes of Health website: https://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/dysphagia.

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The Alzheimer Association has recommendations regarding late-stage Alzheimer’s caregiving that you might find helpful. Just click: https://www.alz.org/care/alzheimers-late-end-stage-caregiving.asp.

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Dementia care advocate and trainer Teepa Snow provides tips regarding feeding and drinking in late stage dementia patients. This is a “must see” brief video: https://youtu.be/sNPAESrllgQ.

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Morningside Ministries has a series of dementia training videos. This one is a helpful five-minute video on “Food Cuing for Appetite and Pleasure:” https://youtu.be/cqyxvHONG18.

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Laura Michael, a dysphagia specialist, has a BS degree in nutrition and owns Dysphagia Supplies Direct, an on-line store. Her website contains four instructional videos regarding the proper use of thickeners: http://www.dysphagiasupplies.com/videos.

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Check out these recipes from the NYU Steinhardt Iron Chef Dysphagia Challenge: https://speech.steinhardt.nyu.edu/dysphagia-cookbook/#recipes.

This article is about the benefits of xanthan gum thickeners vs. modified cornstarch thickeners. You can read it here: http://thickit.com/xanthan-gum-what-is-it-and-why-does-it-matter-for-those-with-dysphagia/.